Apples Best of 2016 Apps

Today the App Store released its annual best of for 2016. The store highlights the top ten app and games giving them prime position on the store front. Interestingly this appears to be a local selection as I have seen various articles showing different winners.

Without further adieu please find this years Australian selection…

iPhone App of the Year

Prisma – Free Photo Editor, Art Filters Pic Effects

Runner Up

Quartz: News in a whole new way

iPhone Game of the Year

Clash Royale

Runner Up

Reigns

iPad App of the Year

Heuristic Shakespeare – The Tempest

Runner Up

Sketchbook Motion

iPad Game of the Year

Severed

Runner Up

Chameleon Run

Instapaper – Instapaper is joining Pinterest

This week Betaworks announced that it had sold Instapaper to Pinterest. This came as a huge surprise to most in the industry leaving most somewhat baffled by the acquisition.

I have had a copy of Instapaper since the early days when Marco Arment was the developer. Instapaper has been my go to app for all my read later needs converting all web pages to readable text in a simple but friendly UI.

All acquisitions like this make you wonder what is next and whether the app will be around in another 12 mths time. In the meantime we can only go by the developers statement1

For you, the Instapaper end user and customer, nothing changes.

  1. Keep your fingers crossed too…it certainly can’t help!

Subscription Pricing: The new bane of the App Store?

image

In App purchases have changed the App Store pricing in a big way. Effectively reducing apps to mobile slot machines that customers pour money into on a daily basis.

Addictive games like Candy Crush Saga started the trend of monetising components of the game to help advance progress. Following suit came Clash of Clans, FIFA 16 Ultimate Team™ and even SimCity. This trend was a boon for mostly gaming developers and saw some games become multi million dollar cash cows.

Prior to WWDC in June Phil Schiller 1 the Apple would be bringing subscription pricing to the App Store for select product categories. Developers largely supported this however there is an undercurrent of concern in the community what this may lead to.

In recent times two big name mobile developers announced changes to their business models. Firstly Smile Software 2 that its much loved TextExpander software would be updated and moving to a subscription model. This decision was met with howls of discontent about its pricing structure and value that it offered with many looking to jump ship and move away from the product entirely. Then in the last few days Evernote which has had subscription pricing for some time 3 an increase its costs and limitations to the free version. This too was not entirely a popular decision.

Subscription pricing whilst offering a cash stream for developers brings concerns for customers; namely value for money. Will a customer see a constant stream of updates and benefits for the dollars they pay? How many apps will go this way and what will people end up paying per year for the privilege?

Let’s look at one company who is doing this and doing it well. As an Apple geek it pains me to say that Microsoft offer a great package for a good price. Office 365 is not a stand alone app but a series of excellent productivity apps that will help any user remain productive at their Mac, iPad or their work PC. The pricing is quite high but what you get is excellent value with the mobile products alone worth every dollar. Microsoft are also keeping the apps up to date and Apple even rolled them out with the launch of the iPad Pro to demonstrate the mark up features with the Apple pen. This is subscription pricing at its best and shows the possibilities to come.

In my opinion Evernote is not an example of a good subscription. Poor quality bloated apps that have failed to innovate and improve on what was once a great idea. Evernote is considered a big developer and it is concerning when they cannot manage to provide a decent offering to subscribers.

Smaller less known developers could potentially struggle to meet expectations and I wonder who is going to monitor this? Would refunds be available? What are Apples expectations of developers offering subscriptions? Lots of questions and few answers yet but time will tell whether this will improve things in the App Store system for developers. The hope is developers and consumers both benefit from this and quality apps become the well supported norm.

  1. Daring Fireball 8th June 2016 ↩︎
  2. Smile Software Annoucement ↩︎
  3. Evernote Annoucement ↩︎

 

Frustrated And Wanting To Someone To Blame

Overnight a wonderful writing app Ulysses was updated finally supporting iPhones and most importantly my beloved iPad Pro. I had been reading all the tweets and press coverage and was excited to get a copy.

The first reviews were published MacStories[1], Macsparky[2] and The Brooks Review[3]. All glowing and adding to the anticipation of what is a fine app.

Let’s get this straight I have no issue with paying a premium for high quality apps. I purchase Omni Group apps which are some of the more expensive apps in the store. In fact I have suggested that apps like Drafts 4 charge more just to support the developers.

Now my frustration… Ulysses was promoted at a special price. I went straight to the App Store searched and there it was and the price was disappointing. As usual we Australians have to live with the fact that US developers sometimes advertise their special price in the app notes. This also means we get to see the difference.

App Pricing

Doing a quick calculation using the mornings exchange rate USD>AUD suggested the app was priced $4 higher than a direct US to Australian conversion. This has been an issue in this country for many years with many big companies charging more here for some reason. Out of frustration I tweeted the developer and the App Store.

The developers response:

@wonk71 @AppStore we have no control over the local prices. But is it possible oz has higher taxes or so? We have the same in Germany here…

Naturally no response from the App Store but it’s a very disappointing practice that looks bad on the developers. If it’s Apple or the Australian Federal Government someone is to blame. It would be nice to know who exactly!

In the end I bought the app and its a bloody gem!